Ermak Travel Guide

 

 

Butrint

Butrint

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Description of Butrint

Butrint

Butrint is famous for its ruins of the ancient Greek and Roman city that are designated as UNESCO World Heritage Site. Buthrotum (Albanian: Butrint, Latin: Buthrōtum, from ancient Greek: Βουθρωτόν, Bouthrōtón) was an ancient Greek, and later Roman city and episcopate in Epirus. Inhabited since prehistoric times, Butrint was a city of the Greek Haon tribe, later a Roman colony and a bishopric. It fell into decay in late antiquity and was completely abandoned in the Middle Ages after a major earthquake that flooded most of the city. Nowadays, this archaeological site of Butrint is located in Vlore, Albania, about 14 km south of Saranda and not far from the Greek border. It is located on a hill overlooking the Vivari Canal and is part of the Butrint National Park. Today, Butrint remains the Latin Catholic title.

 

 

 

ButrintHistory of the Butrint Archaeological Park

Location: 14 km South of the Saranda, Vlore Province

Price: 700 lek for foreigners
500 lek for foreigners in a group of more than 10 people
200 lek for citizens of Albania
Open: 9-16
Tel. +355 852 4600Email: butrint@albaniaonline.net

Butrint or Butrotum stands 14 km south of Saranda in the Vlora Region in Albania. This Archaeological National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The earliest traces of human presence date back to the 12th century BC. According to the Roman writer Virgil, the city was founded by Elen, the son of Priam, the legendary king of Troy. After losing the Trojan War, the Trojans fled here from the Greeks. According to another legend, another refugee from Troy, Aenius visited this city during his attempt to escape away from the Greeks. In the future, he founded the city from which the founders of Rome came out. This legend is visible was invented by the Romans themselves, in order to justify their capture of this beautiful city in 228 BC

Butrint greatly increased during the Republican period of the empire. Veterans Caesar after the victory over Gneem Pompey settled here and increased the boundaries of the city. Caesar's receiver Octavian Augustus continued the tradition of his adoptive father. His veterans also received fertile land at the end of their service life. A new wave of veterans settled here after Augustus defeated General Antony and Empress Cleopatra. The city had the organization of a Roman city with straight streets and buildings of religious and administrative significance. The peninsula was connected to the mainland by a bridge and an aqueduct.

At the beginning of the 6th century, Butrotum (in Latin) received its bishop. Soon, the Byzantines built a new basilica and baptistery here. During the Middle Ages, Butrint became a place of struggle between different civilizations because was on the border of various countries. The Bulgarian kingdom, the Crusaders, the Venetians, and finally the Ottoman Empire all fought for this major city.

In 1797, the city belonged to the Venetians, until they transferred Butrint to Napoleon Bonaparte upon the signing of the peace treaty to Campo Formio. Only 2 years later, the Ottoman army under the command of Ali Pasha Tepelin seized these lands. The city remained in the possession of the Turks until Albania gained independence in 1912. Over the past 10 years it received the status of a National Park and a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

 

Tourist Attractions Butrint

Butrint Archaeological National Park is a fairly large city. Thousands of years of permanent residence left its mark on this hill. To get around all the ruins of this ancient and medieval should be given at least two to three hours. Do not forget to bring enough drinking water. Especially in summer the weather is very hot. Also do not miss the museum of this park. Statues, coins and other small things found here will give an idea of ​​the wealth of this city.


Temple of Asclepius (Butrint)

Temple of Asclepius (Butrint)

Butrint was known in the Greek World as a holy city dedicated to the god Asclepius. A temple dedicated to the god of medicine and healing stands on the south side of the hill. The whole complex of this pagan temple includes a small amphitheater, a pilgrim hotel, a holy spring and other buildings protected by its own wall.

 

Butrint

Theater (Butrint)
Butrint
A small theater was built near the main temple dedicated to the god Asclepius. The pilgrims left part of their money, which helped build this small theater in the 4th century BC. It held theatrical performances, which were an important part of pagan ceremonies. During the Roman rule the theater was enlarged and decorated with statues. The remains of this antique building were excavated by the Italian archaeologist Luigi Maria Ugolini in 1928-30.

Lion Gate (Butrint)
Butrint
The Lion Gate got its name because of the bas-relief of a lion, eating up the head of a bull depicted on it. This stone was originally part of a pagan temple built in the 6th century BC. However, the invasion of the barbarians in the 5th century AD forced the citizens of the city to rebuild their military fortifications. Including the gates of the city walls. Citizens dismantled the old temple and used old stones in the fortification. Apparently the builders were in a hurry and didn’t try hard at building. They simply narrowed the entrance for simplified protection.

The sacred source inside the gate was dedicated to the nymphs, the Roman goddesses who lived in the springs, lakes and other water. The Latin inscription dates from the 2nd century AD and says that a rich woman gave money to decorate the source: "Junia Rufina is a friend of the nymphs." A later inscription dates from the Christian period of the 5th and 6th centuries AD

Baths (Butrint)
Butrint

Baptistery (Butrint)
Butrint
The baptistery was built in the 6th century. It is decorated with beautiful mosaics depicting animals, fish and other animals. This church was used until the 18th century.


Great Basilica (Butrint)
Butrint
Butrint received the episcopal chair at the beginning of the 6th century. There were at least 9 Orthodox churches in the city, but the Great Basilica was the most beautiful and largest. It was built in the shape of a cross. Some of the stones were taken from the remains of an ancient pagan temple that was destroyed to build new buildings. The floor would be covered with beautiful mosaics. Part of it is still preserved.

Venetian Triangular Fortress (Butrint)
Butrint
The Venetian Triangular Fortress was built by the Venetians in the 15th century to protect the Corfu Strait. Today it houses a historical museum dedicated to the history of the city from ancient times to the Middle Ages.

 

 

 


 

Transportation

 

 

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

 

 

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

 

 

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

 

 

Interesting information and useful tips