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Portumna Castle

Portumna Castle

 

 

 

Location: shore of Lough Derg    Map

Constructed: 1610- 1618

 

 

 

Portumna Castle is located at the shore of Lough (lake) Derg where River Shannon flows into the lake in County Galway in Ireland. Portumna Castle was constructed in 1610- 1618. When originally built the castle, Portumna, in that time he had no equal in grandeur and beauty, he surpasses even such great castles as Rathfarnham, Swords, Carrickfergus, Charlemont and Bernard. The elegance and beauty of Portumna castle owes its existence to the Builder of the castle-Richard bercow, IV Earl of Clanricarde, Lord of Connacht, descended from a family of powerful feudal lords de Burgh (Burke) Norman origin. The castle was built from 1610 to 1618. It was spent on its construction 10,000 pounds — at the time it was a huge amount of money. At the same time, the Earl of Clanricarde built the castles of Somerhill and Royal Tunbride wells in Kent (England).

Portamna castle was the first castle in Ireland built in the Renaissance style, which was at that time very common in Italy, France, but in Ireland continued to build castles in the Norman and Gothic styles. Features of the Renaissance architecture of the castle is especially evident in the design of the main entrance, Tuscan style courtyard of the castle, and the castle plan is typical of the Renaissance. The castle is symmetrical in shape, has basements and corner towers. The Central corridor, 3 m wide, runs longitudinally from top to bottom, supported by stone walls that contain numerous recesses and fireplaces.

The castle was abandoned by the owners after a fire in 1826. The public works Department built huge chimneys. The castle has gardens surrounded by a wall of the house, the yard.

 

 

 

 

 

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