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Monasterio de Ucles or Monastery of Ucles

Monasterio de Ucles

 

 

 

Location: Ucles (Cuenca)

Tel. 969 13 50 58

Open: 10am- dusk daily

Closed: 1 & 6 Jan, 25 Dec

 

Description of Monasterio de Ucles or Monastery of Ucles

Monasterio de Ucles or Ucles Monastery is a massive Roman Catholic monastery complex perched on top of the hill near a town of Ucles in the province of Cuenca and was built by the Order of Santiago, whose central house (Caput Ordinis, "Head of the Order") was there. It has the status of Cultural Interes. The monastery is part of a large group of buildings built during different historical periods, beginning during the Muslim domination, reaching its fullness as a fortress during its possession by the Order of Santiago, of which they were their most important home, and acquiring their current aspect once the Reconquest was over.

 

 

 

 

History monastery of Ucles

The hill on which the monastery of Ucles is standing today was once home to Celtiberian castro or castle in antiquity. It was however the Muslims who built a fortification with imposing defensive parapets, some of which can still be seen today. After being definitively conquered by the Christians, King Alfonso VIII ceded the castle to the Order of Santiago in 1174, becoming its headquarters. With the passage of time, an intricate set of dependencies was formed, in which the members of the order resided, who joined the fortress and the church built after the Christian conquest.

 

After the end of the Reconquista, the group of buildings underwent a radical remodeling, which demolished much of the defensive elements of the castle and gave it the current appearance. Not so with the walls, which are still preserved: a first wall protected the old garden, irrigated with the waters of the Bedija river; a second one, currently in very bad condition, still lets you see its arrangement in the form of saw teeth.

 

 

 

 

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