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Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

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Description of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Location: Hilo, Hawaii Island    Map

Area: 505.36 sq mi (1,308.9 km2)

Official site

 

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park is situated near Hilo on the largest island of Hawaii in the Hawaii state in United States. Hawaii Volcanoes National Park protects large expanses of land famous for its active geologic activity and covers an area of 505.36 sq mi (1,308.9 km2). The Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, established in 1916 on the island of Hawaii, shows the result of hundreds of thousands of years of volcanic activity, migration and evolution.

 

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park is surrounded by diverse environments ranging from sea level to the top of the largest volcano on earth, the Mauna Loa 4170 meters high. Kīlauea, one of the most active volcanoes in the world, offers scientists a perspective on the birth of the Hawaiian Islands and visitors, views of the dramatic volcanic landscapes.

 

More than half of the park is designated to the wild land and provides opportunities for unusual hiking and camping. In recognition of its important natural value, the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park has been declared a Biosphere Reserve and World Heritage Site. Volcanic activity generated in the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park helped create Kalapana (now covered in lava by recent eruptions) and other dark sand beaches.

It is said that, if any rock or black sand is collected from the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (or anywhere in Hawaii) the person who picked it up will be cursed by the goddess of Hawaii Pele volcano until it is returned. While it is supposedly an ancient Hawaiian belief historians have recorded it only from the middle of the twentieth century, and many people believe that it was invented by park guards so that visitors do not take stones.

 

 

 

Fees and permits

Entrance fees:
Vehicle $25 (good for 7 days) Admits one single, private, non-commercial vehicle and all of its passengers. Organized non-profit groups, (service organizations, scouts, church groups, college/school clubs) are not eligible for the vehicle permit.
Individual $12 (good for 7 days) Admits one individual when entering by foot, bicycle, or motorcycle. Ages 15 years old and younger are admitted free.
Hawai`i Tri-park Annual Pass $50 Allows access for 1 full year from date of first use at Hawai`i Volcanoes, Haleakala, and Pu`uhonua o Honaunau National Parks.
There are several passes for groups traveling together in a private vehicle or individuals on foot or on bike. These passes provide free entry at national parks and national wildlife refuges, and also cover standard amenity fees at national forests and grasslands, and at lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management and Bureau of Reclamation. These passes are valid at all national parks including Hawaii Volcanoes National Park:

The $80 Annual Pass (valid for twelve months from date of issue) can be purchased by anyone. Military personnel can obtain a free annual pass in person at a federal recreation site by showing a Common Access Card (CAC) or Military ID.
U.S. citizens or permanent residents age 62 or over can obtain a Senior Pass (valid for the life of the holder) in person at a federal recreation site for $80, or through the mail for $90; applicants must provide documentation of citizenship and age. This pass also provides a fifty percent discount on some park amenities. Seniors can also obtain a $20 annual pass.
U.S. citizens or permanent residents with permanent disabilities can obtain an Access Pass (valid for the life of the holder) in person at a federal recreation site at no charge, or through the mail for $10; applicants must provide documentation of citizenship and permanent disability. This pass also provides a fifty percent discount on some park amenities.
Individuals who have volunteered 250 or more hours with federal agencies that participate in the Interagency Pass Program can receive a free Volunteer Pass.
4th graders can receive an Annual 4th Grade Pass that allows free entry for the duration of the 4th grade school year (September-August) to the bearer and any accompanying passengers in a private non-commercial vehicle. Registration at the Every Kid in a Park website is required.
In 2018 the National Park Service will offer four days on which entry is free for all national parks: January 15 (Martin Luther King Jr. Day), April 21 (1st Day of NPS Week), September 22 (National Public Lands Day), and November 11 (Veterans Day weekend).

 

 

 

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