Ermak Travel Guide

 

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Location: 1 km (1/2 mi) North of Watamu   Map

Tel. 042 3246

Open: 7am- 6pm Mon- Sat

www.museums.or.ke

Ruins of Gedi

Ruins of Gedi

 

 

 

 

 

Description of Ruins of Gedi

Ruins of Gedi is an archaeological site situated 1 km (1/2 mi) North of Watamu in Kenya. Gedi is a medieval town was an important trade center along the ocean sea. Ruins of Gedi is all that remains from a vibrant trading community that was an important commercial hub between 13th and 17th centuries. Most of people who lived here were Muslims having converted to Islam by Arab travellers and merchants. In addition to a new religion residents of Gedi also borrowed many of the technologies from the Arabs. This includes Arab triangular sails, navigation and etc. Archaeologists discovered various artefacts from China, India, Spain, Venice and other locations indicating that traders from Gedi undertook long trips across oceans.

 

Ruins of Gedi

 

Population of Gedi was estimated to be at least 2500 residents. They constructed Mosque, palace and other private and commercial buildings from local coral reefs that they mined in the sea. All that came to an end in the early 16th century when citizens were caught in the war between Mombasa and Malinda. Residents were forced to abandon their home and Gedi became a ghost town. There have been reports about various nomadic people (like Oromo tribe from Somalia or Arabs from Arabian Peninsula) who temporary lived here over a course of a 16th and 17th century. However neglect and abandonment made structures too fragile. Eventually Ruins of Gedi were overgrown by jungle inhabited by local monkeys. Local citizens claim that this ghost town is also inhabited by the "Old ones" spirits of the people who once lived here. They guard their city against intruders even after death.

 

Ruins of Gedi

 

Whatever might the case Ruins of Gedi were declared a Kenyan National Park in 1948.

 

 

 

 

Ruins of Gedi

 

 

 

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