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Location: Arusha   Map

Area: 2,850 km²

www.tarangire.or.tz

Tarangire National Park

Tarangire National Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tarangire National Park is situated near town of Arusha in the Northern Tanzania. Tarangire National Park covers an area of 2,850 km². The park is located in the Manyara region, it is 118 km from the center of the neighboring Arusha region and only 7 km from Lake Manyara. The Tarangire River flows through the park, which almost completely dries in the dry years, however it is the only source of moisture around. The river flows from south to north and immediately outside the park flows into Lake Burungi.

The park is located in the Masai steppe, which is characterized by hilly terrain with swamps in the lowlands. The park has a number of large hills, among them Loxisale 2132 m high in the east and Kvaraha 2415 high in the west.

The park is one of the elements of the northern safari in the country and is often visited along with the Ngorongoro Crater and Serengeti National Park.

The average rainfall is 600 mm per year.

 

 

 

The park is home to many animals, the number of which is still increasing before the rainy season, when herbivores come in large numbers to the last meadows. Animals flock to the river from an area of ​​20 thousand km², including zebras, buffaloes, impalas, gazelles, éland, water goats and others. Among the permanent inhabitants of the park are elephants, as well as gemstones and gerenuki. Trees are a favorite destination for lions, leopards and pythons.

The park has more than 550 species of birds, including the largest bird - the ostrich, and the heaviest flying bird - the African Great Bustard. Many birds are endemic to this part of Tanzania. Old termite mounds are the habitat of fiery-headed trachyphonuses (African warts) and dwarf mongooses.

 

 

 

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