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Termessos Archaeological Site (Τερμησσός)

 

Termessos Archaeological Site is an ancient city located 35 km (22 mi) Northwest of Antalya in Turkey. It was constructed in a fairly usual location on a Western slope of Gulluk Dag mountain at elevation between 3500 feet and 5000 feet above sea level. The city was probably abandoned due to earthquakes rather than enemy attacks. Its isolation from the trade routes made this massive settlement into a hiding place.

 

 

 

Location: 35 km (22 mi) Northwest of Antalya   Map

Open:

summer 7:30am- 7:30pm daily

winter 7:30am- 4:30pm daily

 

 

 

History of Termessos Archaeological Site

Ancient Greek legend claims that the city was found by a legendary hero Bellerephon. He was one of the most famous warriors who captured and tamed Pegasus (winged horse) and defeated the Chimera. This mystical creature had a head of a lion, body of a goat and a tail of the snake. The terrain of the surrounding lands prevented residents of the city from access to the sea and thus active trade, but at the same time it helped Termessos' citizens to actively defend their small stronghold. Even Alexander the Great who passed this pass in 333BC on his way to conquer Persian Empire failed to capture the city. He abandoned his futile attempts to storm the walled city and instead moved on with his armies. During conquest by the Roman Empire the city has kept its independent status granted by the Roman Senate in 71 BC. It is somewhat unclear when the end of the city came about, but it is clear that collapse of the aqueduct in a series of earthquake spelled doom for the city.

 

Theatre (Termessos Archaeological Site)

 

Theatre of Termessos is situated at the highest point of the city. It dates back to the Hellenistic times. At the Roman times it was further increased in size and number of seats of city's residents.

Gymnasium (Termessos Archaeological Site)

Hadrian's Temple (Termessos Archaeological Site)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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