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Voergard Castle

Voergård Castle

Voergard Castle is a Renaissance building located 10 km (6 mi) North of Dronningelund. Voergard citadel was constructed in 1481 by the orders Stygge Krumpen, bishop of Børglum.

 

 

Location: Voergard 6, Dronningelund    Map

Constructed: 1481 by Stygge Krumpen, bishop of Børglum

Tel. 98 86 71 08

Open: Easter: 11am- 4pm

May- mid- Jun: 1pm- 4pm Sat 11am- 4pm Sun & holidays

Mid- Jun- Aug: 10am- 5pm daily

Sep- early Oct: 1pm- 4pm Sat 11am- 4pm Sun, autumn holidays 1pm- 4pm

www.voergaardslot.dk

 

 

 

History of Voergard Castle

 

During Count's Feud the castle was taken in 1534 by the peasant armies under leadership of Klemen Andersen "Skipper Clement". Part of the Voergard Castle were demolished by the invaders. After Denmark went along with Reformation much of the church's properties were confiscated by the Royal Crown, including Voergard Castle. In 1578 it was ceded by Frederick II to Karen Krabbe, whose daughter Ingeborg Skeel undertook a massive restoration to a dilapidated building. The renovation project was completed in 1588 in Renaissance style.

 

Ingeborg Skeel herself became notorious for treating her peasants harshly and most of the ghost sightings in the castle were attributed to her re- appearance. Voergard Castle changed hands several times over next three centuries. In 1872 rich land owner and a politician Peder Brønnum Scavenius bought the castle and much of the land that surrounded it. In 1955 the castle was acquitted by Ejnar Oberbech-Clausen, who undertook a massive restoration project and created an art museum that is open to the public today. The collection of Voergård Castle includes art of El Greco, Raphael, Peter Paul Rubens, Francisco Goya, Watteau and Frans Hals and furniture from the Louis XIV and Louis XVI from the 17th and 18th century.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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