Ermak Travel Guide

 

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Agrigento

Agrigento

Agrigento or Akragas as it was known to the ancients is located in the southwestern end of island of Sicily. It was a powerful city- state independent of its mother- city. Rich revenues that it made from trade and wheat production were used to build magnificent temples in the valley just two miles from a modern city.

 

 

 

Location: Province of Agrigento  Map

 

Tel: 0922 49 72 26 (info)

 

Transport: bus: 1, 1/, 2, 2/, 3

 

Hours: 8:30 am  - 10 pm

 

 

 

 

Travel Destinations in Agrigento

Temple of Concord (Agrigento)

 

One of the best preserved temples in Agrigento is a Temple of Concord. Partially it is due to the fact that in the 6th century AD it was converted to Christian Church. Additionally the area around the temple has remains of early Christian tombs and catacombs. In the 18th century the Temple of Concord became the monument of Hellenistic culture.

 

 

Temple of Zeus (Agrigento)

 

 

Another majestic temple in the area of Agrigento is that of Zeus. It was probably commemorated to the victory of joint forces of Akragas (Agrigento) and Syracuse over Carthaginians under Hamilcar in 480 BC. The slave labor used in its construction was that of Carthaginian prisoners of war. According to historian Diodorus Siculus the temple was a magnificent structure, but it was not completed. The dimensions of the temple would have been 112 meters by 56 meters, with a height of 20 meters. The colossal telamons those remains are still visible lying on the ground supported the weight of the roof and symbolizes former enslavement of the Greeks by the Carthage.

 

 

Temple of Hercules (Agrigento)

 

Temple of Demeter and Persephone (Agrigento)

 

Other temples in the area were devoted to Heracles (oldest temple), of Demeter and Persephone, Hephaestus and Asclepius. The temples were ruined by earthquakes that toppled many of them. The destruction was added by later generations who used the stone as a building material for later structures.

 

Temple of Juno (Agrigento)

 

 

 

 

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