Dojran (Дојран)

 

Dojran (another name Polin, Polenin, Poljanin, variants Dorjan, Dogrjan, village Δοϊράνη, Dojrani) is a historic town in the southeastern part of the Republic of Macedonia on the shores of Lake Dojran, which was destroyed in the First World War when it had 18,000 inhabitants. Today, the name Dojran is carried by three settlements located around Lake Dojran:

Settlement Star Dojran (363 inhabitants), center of the Municipality of Dojran in the Republic of Macedonia on the site of the old town,
Settlement Nov Dojran (1100 inhabitants) in the Republic of Macedonia 5 km north of the old town,
Settlement Dojran (Δοϊράνη) (183 inhabitants) in Aegean Macedonia on the southern shore of Lake Dojran on the site of the old Dojran railway station.

 

Legend

There are many legends and legends about Dojran. Here is how this: In the place where today's Dojran is lived a very beautiful girl, Dojran. After her, an Ottoman bey noticed her and fell in love with her. He went to her parents and asked her for a wife. But the girl did not like him. So one day she went to fill the pitchers with water from a spring. But then the Islamic bey (the one who was in love with her) noticed her and ran after her. But she did not like him and did not want others around her to suffer, so she threw herself into the spring! The next day, the spring expanded, flooding the whole place. It became a lake. After the girl's name - Dojrana, the lake got its name 'Dojran'.

History of Dojran
In the 5th century BC. the valley of Prazias (now Lake Dojran) was inhabited by the Paionians. They lived on the shore of the lake, in wooden huts surrounded by reeds and placed on scaffolding that rested on long wooden stakes. Only the boats were connected to the mainland with very good handling, which is why the attempts of the conquerors (Persians) were often unsuccessful. They were married many times, and engaged in hunting, fishing, agriculture and animal husbandry. They were very good swimmers and divers. Each of them had an opening in his hut to the lake (at the bottom of the hut floor) through which they fished in abundance and fed even horses and cattle. The region around Lake Prezias at that time belonged territorially to the Macedonian state whose king was Amyntas, then to his son Alexander I after him, then Perdiccas II (454 - 413 BC) then Archelaus I (418 - 399 BC). .н.е.). In the first and second centuries BC. during the time of Philip II and Alexander the Great and in the period when the Romans began to enter the Balkans (II century BC) on the west coast of Prazias (today, locality Toplec) on an area of ​​about 30 hectares was already spread ancient city ​​- a fortress with the oldest known name Taurian. In 395, during the division of the Roman Empire into West and East, whose center was Visit (Constantinople), Taurian became part of the Eastern Roman Empire, ie Byzantium. Then comes the time when the Slavs settled in the Balkans. At the beginning of the ninth century, Taurian was considered a city which, thanks to its location and development, occupies an important place in terms of historical, cultural and economic developments. Although there are no written and documented data that will accurately characterize Taurian in this century, it is most likely to be assumed that in one of the years of the IX century due to a cholera epidemic and its consequences the city was moved slightly lower - to the south. The new town gets a new name Pauline.

 

The new city by the lake also accepts the habits of the old Taurian. Basic life joys remain: good fishing, successful hunting, home garden and healthy cattle birth. However, being at the crossroads where the interests of the Byzantines and the Bulgarians clashed, where the Macedonian state of Samuel expanded or narrowed (period from 969 to 1018) and where the conquering armies of the Serbian kings passed (Milutin 1282 and Dusan 1331 - 1355) Pauline also had to face the not-so-pleasant things of the time. In addition to the wars, its inhabitants had to pay various taxes to the Byzantine state. Between 1026 and 1037 to 1039, Pauline residents experienced earthquakes, droughts, floods, and epidemics. Living in the time of all this, they in their Pauline by the lake "welcomed" the brand new and longest-lasting guests - masters, the Ottoman Turks. The Turks gave the third name of the city - Dojran. In the second half of the 15th century, Dojran was a nahija - the center of several rural municipalities. Almost in the same period (1519) or 148 years after the arrival of the Turks in Dojran, some documents say that 232 families lived in it. Only three of them were Muslim and all the other 229 families were Christian. Massive colonization of Dojran with a Turkish population took place in the first half of the 17th century. At that time, in the vicinity of Dojran, there were villages in which exclusively Turkish population lives today: Gjopceli, Chaushli, Sevendekli, Dedeli, Kurtamzali, Organzali and others who are currently displaced. Due to the proximity and influence of the current social and political processes, Dojran was a city with an amphitheater appearance of two parts: lower - where the local population lived and upper - where the Turkish population was located. The city was built in the style of Constantinople and Thessaloniki architecture. It had cobbled streets, clean drinking water captured from springs above the city and carried to several city fountains through canal pipes, a city bath - a hammam that served all residents, men and women, Christians and Muslims, three churches and three mosques. several schools (several primary and one gymnasium) and a common clock tower. Dojran at that time belonged to about 79 villages with a population of about 30,000, of which over 18,000 Turks, more than 9,500 Macedonians, about 160 Jews and 1,000 Roma).

Against the ruined city at that time it was as if the lake turned and flooded its coastal part with everything that was once bars, houses, markets and streets. Faced with the harsh reality of their Dojran, which offered virtually no living conditions in it, sixty fishing families in 1919/20 squandered their longing to return to the old hearth near the foundations of the old Taurian. 4 km from the ruined Dojran, they create a new settlement called Nov Dojran. But like the previous "masters" the Turks, the Kingdom of SHS in this area is inhabited by 29 families of Serb population, during which the settlement Sretenovo was formed. In time, families began to return to the old town of Dojran. The then government, for its own reasons, located the administrative-administrative life in the ruined city. Thus, a parallel pulsation of life in Nov and Star Dojran gradually began. In World War II, Dojran was again the target of neighbors' wishes to be finally released on November 5, 1944. That meant a qualitatively new beginning and equal and impressive progress for both Dojranas. Besides Dojran Lake, today on the Macedonian side there are three settlements: Nov Dojran, Star Dojran and Nikolic with over 4,000 inhabitants. The population in the mid-50s began to engage in tourism. In its function today along the Dojran coast there are 40 facilities (hotels and resorts) of companies from all over the country, 4 commercial hotels and as many modern casinos and over 600 weekend houses.

 

The new city by the lake also accepts the habits of the old Taurian. Basic life joys remain: good fishing, successful hunting, home garden and healthy cattle birth. However, being at the crossroads where the interests of the Byzantines and the Bulgarians clashed, where the Macedonian state of Samuel expanded or narrowed (period from 969 to 1018) and where the conquering armies of the Serbian kings passed (Milutin 1282 and Dusan 1331 - 1355) Pauline also had to face the not-so-pleasant things of the time. In addition to the wars, its inhabitants had to pay various taxes to the Byzantine state. Between 1026 and 1037 to 1039, Pauline residents experienced earthquakes, droughts, floods, and epidemics. Living in the time of all this, they in their Pauline by the lake "welcomed" the brand new and longest-lasting guests - masters, the Ottoman Turks. The Turks gave the third name of the city - Dojran. In the second half of the 15th century, Dojran was a nahija - the center of several rural municipalities. Almost in the same period (1519) or 148 years after the arrival of the Turks in Dojran, some documents say that 232 families lived in it. Only three of them were Muslim and all the other 229 families were Christian. Massive colonization of Dojran with a Turkish population took place in the first half of the 17th century. At that time, in the vicinity of Dojran, there were villages in which exclusively Turkish population lives today: Gjopceli, Chaushli, Sevendekli, Dedeli, Kurtamzali, Organzali and others who are currently displaced. Due to the proximity and influence of the current social and political processes, Dojran was a city with an amphitheater appearance of two parts: lower - where the local population lived and upper - where the Turkish population was located. The city was built in the style of Constantinople and Thessaloniki architecture. It had cobbled streets, clean drinking water captured from springs above the city and carried to several city fountains through canal pipes, a city bath - a hammam that served all residents, men and women, Christians and Muslims, three churches and three mosques. several schools (several primary and one gymnasium) and a common clock tower. Dojran at that time belonged to about 79 villages with a population of about 30,000, of which over 18,000 Turks, more than 9,500 Macedonians, about 160 Jews and 1,000 Roma).

Against the ruined city at that time it was as if the lake turned and flooded its coastal part with everything that was once bars, houses, markets and streets. Faced with the harsh reality of their Dojran, which offered virtually no living conditions in it, sixty fishing families in 1919/20 squandered their longing to return to the old hearth near the foundations of the old Taurian. 4 km from the ruined Dojran, they create a new settlement called Nov Dojran. But like the previous "masters" the Turks, the Kingdom of SHS in this area is inhabited by 29 families of Serb population, during which the settlement Sretenovo was formed. In time, families began to return to the old town of Dojran. The then government, for its own reasons, located the administrative-administrative life in the ruined city. Thus, a parallel pulsation of life in Nov and Star Dojran gradually began. In World War II, Dojran was again the target of neighbors' wishes to be finally released on November 5, 1944. That meant a qualitatively new beginning and equal and impressive progress for both Dojranas. Besides Dojran Lake, today on the Macedonian side there are three settlements: Nov Dojran, Star Dojran and Nikolic with over 4,000 inhabitants. The population in the mid-50s began to engage in tourism. In its function today along the Dojran coast there are 40 facilities (hotels and resorts) of companies from all over the country, 4 commercial hotels and as many modern casinos and over 600 weekend houses.


Cultural and historical monuments
Church of St. Elijah (1905 - 1968)
Clock tower
Turkish bath-hammam
Monastery (Mary Magdalene)