Ermak Travel Guide

 

Cherepovets

Cherepovets

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transportation

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

Interesting information and useful tips

 

Description of Cherepovets

Cherepovets is a city in the Vologda Oblast of Russia, the administrative center of the Cherepovetsky district, which is not part of, having the status of a city of regional significance and forming a city district. It is located at the confluence of the Yagorba River into the Sheksna River (left tributary of the Volga), not far from the Rybinsk reservoir, 126 km west of Vologda. Population - 318 856 people. (2017). The area is 126 km2. Cherepovets is the largest by territory and population of the city of the Vologda region.

 

 

 

Travel Destinations in Cherepovets

Cherepovets is located in the southwest of Vologda on the Sheksna River at the place of its inflow into the Rybinsk Reservoir. On the territory of the city is centered around the mouth of the river Yagorba, which flows into Sheksna.

Administratively, the city is divided into four districts:
Industrial (in local vernacular - just "City"). The oldest in the city, in the west adjoins the factory territory (enterprises of OAO Severstal).
Zayagorbsky (Zarechensky, "District"). It is located east of the Industrial District, and south-east of the North, beyond the river Yagorba. It is connected by bridges with the Industrial and Northern regions.
Zasheksninsky (in the people also - "104th" or "Prostokvashino"). As the name suggests, it is located beyond the Sheksna River, in the south of the Industrial and Zayagorbsky districts. You can get there only from the Industrial District, along the Oktyabrsky Bridge.
Northern (district FMK, in the people - "Fanera" aka Plywood). The area of ​​the Plywood Furniture Plant, located north of the Industrial District. Areas are separated by rail.

 

There are not many attractions in Cherepovets, itself. The main street is Sovetskij Prospect and it is a nice walk along it. At the end of Sovetskij is the Cathedral of the Resurrection of Christ, which was recently restored and a nice park around it on Cathedral Hills with a small museum to one of the city's first mayors - Milyutin. In addition, the Church of the Nativity, which sits farther down the embankment has also been recently restored. On Sovetskij there is a small museum with some local artifacts, and nearby another museum to the local aristocrat and painter of the 19th century Vasilij Vereshchagin, known for his landscapes and Eastern themes. Another main site is the main bridge connecting Zasheksninskij region with the rest of the city. There are also many monuments and parks throughout the city. Cherepovets is accessible to many fascinating sites in the Vologda Region, including Vologda, Kirillo-Belezersky Monastery, Belozersk, and Ustyuzhna.

 

 

History of Cherepovets

The foundation of Cherepovets is traditionally ascribed to two orthodox monks Feodosy and Afanasy. In 1362, they founded the Cherepovets Resurrection Monastery, in the vicinity of which a small village of Fedosyevo was founded. Historians consider the former village of Fedosyevo to be in the center of modern Cherepovets. Several centuries were needed to develop the small village into a prominent trade, manufacturing, and transportation regional center. Cherepovets was granted city status in 1777 by Catherine the Great and became the center of a separate uyezd in the administrative structure of the Novgorod Governorate.

Construction of Mariinsk canal system in 1810 made a significant impact on the development of the city. The Mariinsk Canal System connected Cherepovets with Volga River to the south and the Baltic Sea to the west. At that time, the city was still in the very early stage of development with the population of 3000 residents by 1863. For a long time, the city brickworks with seven workers was the sole industrial enterprise in Cherepovets.

The development of city became more dynamic after Emancipation Reform happened in 1861 and appearance of the shipbuilding industry. The city soon became a prominent shipbuilding and logistics center tying major regional rail- and waterways. The population had grown to 10,000 by 1915.

After the revolution, in March 1918, eastern uyezds of the Novgorod Governorate were renamed to separate Cherepovets Governorate centered around Cherepovets. The new governorate existed for less than 10 years. In 1927, it was merged with Leningrad, Novgorod, Pskov, and Murmansk Governorates into a single Leningrad Oblast. In September 1937, most of the former Cherepovets Governorate territories (with the exception of Tikhvin district) were transferred to the newly established Vologda Oblast.

The subsequent development of the city is closely tied to the completion of construction of the Cherepovets metallurgy plant (now known as Severstal) in 1955, the second-biggest in the country. Unlike the majority of the most important metallurgy centers in the former Soviet Union, the location of the future steel plant was selected far away from the actual mineral resources and deposits. The reason for that was the logistic advantage of having well-developed infrastructure that allowed connection of the north and northwest of the country by rail, road, and waterways into a single operation system. It connected such remote mining centers as Vorkuta and Olenegorsk, Murmansk Oblast.

The rapid growth of industry center drastically changed the city, and by the early 1960s, its population exceeded 100,000 residents (three times bigger than the pre-World War II population). By 1970, Cherepovets had become the most populated city in Vologda Oblast.

 

 

 


 

Transportation

Get in
The easiest and most inexpensive way to get to Cherepovets is by train from either St. Petersburg or Moscow. From St. Petersburg, the best option is the Vologda "Belye Nochi (White Nights)" Train 688я, which leaves at 22:40 and arrives at 6:18 the next day. There are also trains going to other locations, such as Arkhangelsk, Sverdlovsk, and Almaty which go through Cherepovets. From Moscow, there is only really one option, unless travelling to Vologda first, which can be quite difficult. That option is the Moscow - Cherepovets train, which leaves at 21:05 daily, and arrives at 08:35 the next day. Both trains are "firmenny" or of better quality. Like on most trains, there are "Platskart" (open sleeper car), "Kupe" (closed compartment car), and a couple of forms of "Lyuks" (Deluxe cars). Full train schedules can be seen here (in Russian). By air, the only company serving Cherepovets is Severstal' Airlines (in Russian). They have flights from Moscow (Vnukovo) daily, some flights from Domodedovo airport in Moscow, and occasionally flights to/from St. Petersburg, Penza and Sochi, Petrozavodsk, and Helsinki. With enough plannign and if you know how to work with Russian travel agents, then you can find reasonbly priced flights.

Get around
Taxis are by far the most convenient way to travel around Cherepovets. Depending on how far you want to go, prices range from 60 - 90 RUR per trip. From the train station the prices are a bit higher. What is nice is that the prices are set and are determined by what regions you are traveling to. There are also many bus lines that run very frequently throughout the day, but to really orient your way on these buses, or throughout Cherepovets, some Russian is required. Buses run about every hour from 5:00-20:00 to Vologda and back, and many of these buses are very high-quality. Buses also run frequently to Kirillov, Belozersk, Ustyuzhna, Rybinsk, Yaroslavl' and other locations.

 

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

The hotels in the city have not improved much since Soviet times. One exception is the new hotel "Amparo," although it is very pricey. Hotel "Edinstvo" is less expensive, but also not as nice. Some low-end options include Hotel "Sunday" and Hotel "Leningrad."

 

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

In general, there are many good options of places to eat in Cherepovets as the city is fairly wealthy because of the steel industry. Some of the best places are:
Restaurant "Karavaj" on Sovetskij Prospect has good Russian cuisine
Restaurant "Pizzeria" has good pizza, although with a Russian twist
Restaurant "Park Palas" on Ulitsa Maksima Gorkogo has good European food and a large outdoor section

Drink
The aforementioned "Park Palas" is one of the calmer options if you are looking for just a couple of drinks. There are some bigger nightclubs throughout the city including "Terminal", "Truba", "Dacha," "Boogie-Woogie," and "Royal.'"

 

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

 

 

Interesting information and useful tips

Buy
The store "Suveniry" on Sovetskij Prospect has some of the best souvenirs in Russia at the best prices, including local crafts and costumes. There are many stores along Sovetskij Prospect and Prospect Lenina to find really anything you need, although you're better off buying some things in the major cities. In addition, there are many shopping centers throughout the city, and they continue to be built.