Ermak Travel Guide

 

Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky

Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transportation

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

Interesting information and useful tips

 

Description of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky

Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky is a city in Russia, the administrative center of the Kamchatka Territory. It constitutes an administrative-territorial unit (a city of regional subordination), within which the Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky urban district municipality is formed. Population - 181,216 people. (2018). Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky - the location of the base of the Pacific Fleet of Russia.

 

Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky is the capital and largest city and port of the region, in the local dialect Peter. It is located on the shore of Avacha Bay, surrounded by snowy snowy mountains visible on the horizon from anywhere in the city. The population is 200 thousand people. It is the main arrival point for travelers, has a developed tourist infrastructure.

 

 

 

History of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky

Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky is considered to be founded by Danish navigator Vitus Bering in the service of the Russian Navy, although the foundation was laid by navigator Ivan Yelagin a few months earlier. Bering reached Avacha Bay in late 1740 and as superior, named the new settlement "Petropavlovsk" (Peter and Paul) after his two ships, the St. Peter and the St. Paul, built in Okhotsk for his second expedition. The town's location on the sheltered Avacha Bay and at the mouth of the Avacha River saw it develop to become the most important settlement in Kamchatka. It was granted town status on April 9, 1812.

During the 1854–1855 Crimean War, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky was put under siege by the Anglo-French forces, but never fell. The city had been fortified under the command of Nikolay Muravyov-Amursky in the years prior, but only possessed a small garrison of a few hundred soldiers and sixty-seven cannons. After much exchange of fire, 600 Anglo-French troops landed south of the city, but were forced to retreat by only 230 Russian troops after heavy fighting. One week later, 900 Anglo-French troops landed east of the town, but were again repelled by the Russians. The allied ships then retreated from Russian waters. The total Russian losses were reported at around 100 men; those of the Anglo-French at least five times that number.

At the time of the Surrender of Japan in World War II, United States Naval Construction Battalion 114 was in the Aleutians. In September 1945 the battalion was ordered to send a detachment to the USSR to build a Naval Advance Base (a Fleet Weather Central). It was located 10 miles outside Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky and was code named TAMA. The original agreement gave the Seabees 3 weeks to complete the camp. Upon arrival the Russians told the Seabees they had 10 days and were amazed that the Seabees did it. It was one of two that Stalin agreed to. The other was near Khabarovsk, in buildings provided by the Russians. For mail Petropavlovsk was assigned Navy number 1169, FPO San Francisco. The American's use of these two bases was short lived.

Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky was a great source of fish, particularly salmon, and crab meat for the Soviet Union in the 20th century. Since the end of the Soviet era, fishing rights have also been granted to foreign interests. Poaching of salmon for their caviar at Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky remains a problem amid lax law enforcement and widespread corruption.

 

 

 

 


 

Transportation

To Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky by plane

Yelizovo Airport (Russian: Аэропорт Елизово) (IATA: PKC, ICAO: UHPP) is an airport located in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, Kamchatka Krai. Its 3,400 m (11,200 ft) runway is long enough to accommodate a fully loaded Ilyushin Il-96 or Boeing 707 aircraft. The main apron contains 34 parking spaces, 18 of which can service large wide-body airliners, such as Ilyushin IL-96; additional 8 paved spaces for smaller aircraft and 12 unpaved parking spaces.

 

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

 

 

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

 

 

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

 

 

Interesting information and useful tips