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Waterton Lakes National Park

Waterton Lakes

 

 

 

Location: Alberta   Map

Area: 505 km²

 

 

 

Description of Waterton Lakes National Park

Waterton Lakes National Park is located in Alberta province in Canada, near the border with Montana, United States. Waterton was the fourth national park of Canada, created in 1895 and named in such a way by Lake Waterton. Waterton Lakes National Park covers an area of 505 km². The park offers a wide network of hiking trails. You can also take it to the back country camping. You need a camping permit for $10 a night or buy an annual pass for $68.70. Additionally there are several camping grounds on the territory of the Waterton Lakes National Park.

 

Waterton Lakes National Park is managed by Parks of Canada, Waterton is open all year, but the main tourist season is during the months of July and August. The only commercial facilities available in the park are in the town of Waterton Park. The park goes from an elevation of 1,290 m, in the town, to 2,910 m on Mount Blakiston. It offers many picturesque trails, including Lake Crypt. In 1979 it was named a Biosphere Reserve and in 1995 a World Heritage Site as part of the Waterton-Glacier Peace International Park.

 

Waterton Lakes National Park covers an area of 505 km² (195 sq mi), about the size of the Island on Montreal.

Waterton is open all year, but the main tourist season is during July and August. The only commercial facilities available within the park are located at the Waterton Park townsite. The park ranges in elevation from 1,290 metres (4,232 ft) at the townsite to 2,910 m (9,547 ft) at Mount Blakiston. It offers many scenic trails, including Crypt Lake trail. In 2012/2013, Waterton Lakes National Park had over 400,000 visitors.

Contact the park office +1 403-859-5133, toll-free: 1-888-773-8888 or email: waterton.info@pc.gc.ca

 

 

Campgrounds in Waterton Lakes National Park

Belly River Campground

off the highway 6

Open: mid- May- mid- Sept

Entrance Fee: $15.70 a night

First come, first served basis

Crandell Mountain Campground

Red Rock Parkway, 6 km South of Highway 5 intersection

Open: mid- May- Labor Day

Entrance Fee: $21.50

First come, first served basis

Townsite Campground

Windflower Rd

Open: mid- April- mid- Oct

Entrance Fee: $38.20/ $27.40 (serviced site/ not- serviced site)

 

 

 

 

Fees and permits

There is no fee to enter the park if you are just driving through along Highway 6. However, if you want to do any activities, visit the townsite or stay overnight, a daily fee will apply. The fee is paid at the gatehouse on Highway 5, on the road to Waterton townsite, just after its junction with Highway 6.

If staying for a week or more, the annual park pass is a good value, though it can only be used in Waterton. An annual Discovery Pass can also be purchased for a higher fee and be used in Waterton and at the nearby Banff National Park, Jasper National Park, and many other national parks and historic sites.

Daily fees summer/shoulder season (2018):
Adult $ 7.80/$ 5.80
Senior $ 6.80/$ 4.90
Children and youth under 18 free
Family/group $ 15.70/$ 11.75
Annual (2018):
Adult $ 39.20
Senior $ 34.30
Children and youth under 18 free
Family/group $ 78.50

Fishing permit (2018):
Daily $ 9.80
Annual $ 34.30
Parks Canada Passes
The Discovery Pass provides unlimited admission for a full year at over 80 Parks Canada places that typically charge a daily entrance fee It provides faster entry and is valid for 12 months from date of purchase. Prices for 2018 (taxes included):

Family/group (up to 7 people in a vehicle): $136.40
Children and youth (0-17): free
Adult (18-64): $67.70
Senior (65+): $57.90
The Cultural Access Pass: people who have received their Canadian citizenship in the past year can qualify for free entry to some sites.

 

 

 

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