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Lake Powell

Lake Powell

 

 

 

 

 

 

Description of Lake Powell

Location: Utah    Map

Surface Area: 658 km2 (254 sq mi)

Info: Carl Hayden Visitor Center, (928) 608 6404

Open: Apr- Oct: 8am- 5pm daily

Nov- Mar: 8am- 4:30pm daily

 

Lake Powell is situated in Utah, United States. It covers a total area of 658 km2 (254 sq mi). Lake Powell formerly known as Glen Canyon lake Powell was flooded in 1960’s. Lake Powell is the largest man- made lake in USA created in 1956 when parts of Glen Canyon was flooded after construction of a dam on the Colorado River. The resulting reservoir was named after the explorer John Wesley Powell, who in 1869 first explored the Colorado river and first explored the beauty of the surrounding landscapes.

 

Lake Powell is surrounded by canyon walls of bright orange, red and white sandstone. A rich palette of shades of rock formations perfectly combine with the blue- green waters of the Powell reservoir. Since 1972 lake Powell and surrounding lands became the part of the recreation area. The best way to travel around the lake Powell is to rent a boat as water as a kind of highway to get around. Regulations are loose in the area so any place can be considered as a campsite. Overland trails also exist, but they are limited by geological formations.

 

Fishing at Lake Powell

You can fish in lake Powell and buying a fishing permit is preferable, but little is done to enforce it so it is up to a camper’s conciseness. Try fishing in the morning and change your position to find a good spot. If you find it, it might take less than an hour to feed a crowd of hungry campers.

 

Diving and cliff jumping at Lake Powell

Although both are illegal in lake Powell, little is done to stop this practice due to small number of staff that serves the area. Especially cliff jumping from height of several dozens feet proved to be the best way to wake up in the morning.

 

 

 

Fees and permits

Entrance fees for a private vehicle are $15, while individuals (on foot, on bike, or on motorcycle) must pay a $7 entrance fees. All entrance fees are good for seven consecutive days. The Glen Canyon NRA Annual Pass is $30 and provides entrance for one year.

There are several passes for groups traveling together in a private vehicle or individuals on foot or on bike. These passes provide free entry at national parks and national wildlife refuges, and also cover standard amenity fees at national forests and grasslands, and at lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management and Bureau of Reclamation. These passes are valid at all national parks including Glen Canyon National Recreation Area:

The $80 Annual Pass (valid for twelve months from date of issue) can be purchased by anyone. Military personnel can obtain a free annual pass in person at a federal recreation site by showing a Common Access Card (CAC) or Military ID.
U.S. citizens or permanent residents age 62 or over can obtain a Senior Pass (valid for the life of the holder) in person at a federal recreation site for $80, or through the mail for $90; applicants must provide documentation of citizenship and age. This pass also provides a fifty percent discount on some park amenities. Seniors can also obtain a $20 annual pass.
U.S. citizens or permanent residents with permanent disabilities can obtain an Access Pass (valid for the life of the holder) in person at a federal recreation site at no charge, or through the mail for $10; applicants must provide documentation of citizenship and permanent disability. This pass also provides a fifty percent discount on some park amenities.
Individuals who have volunteered 250 or more hours with federal agencies that participate in the Interagency Pass Program can receive a free Volunteer Pass.
4th graders can receive an Annual 4th Grade Pass that allows free entry for the duration of the 4th grade school year (September-August) to the bearer and any accompanying passengers in a private non-commercial vehicle. Registration at the Every Kid in a Park website is required.
In 2018 the National Park Service will offer four days on which entry is free for all national parks: January 15 (Martin Luther King Jr. Day), April 21 (1st Day of NPS Week), September 22 (National Public Lands Day), and November 11 (Veterans Day weekend).

 

 

 

 

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