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Sequoia National Park

Weminuche Wilderness Area

Sequoia National Park is situated in Tulare County, California in United States. Sequoia National Park covers an area of 404,051 acres (1,635 km2) of virgin forests that consists largely of Sequoia trees.

 

 

 

Location: Tulare County, CA  Map

Area: 404,051 acres (1,635 km2)

www.nps.gov/seki

 

 

 

Description of Sequoia National Park

Sequoia National Park receives more than a million tourists from all over the World who want to see the largest and some of the oldest trees on a planet. Some of Redwoods or Sequoia (after Sequioideae subfamily of plants) reach a diameter of 8 meters. The bark of redwoods is somewhat unusual to touch. It is fibrous and your hand seem to sink in its bark. Forest Giants is the most accessible and hence most popular are of the park. Here you can see five some of the largest trees on the planet. The most famous of them is named after Civil War general Sherman.

 

Tunnel Log (Sequoia National Park)

As you travel along the road you can witness a fallen redwood tree that blocked the road. It fell in 1937 due to natural causes. Instead of removing giant tree park rangers simply carved an arch so vehicles could pass underneath this giant structure. It measures 17 feet (5.2 meters) in height and 8 foot (2.4 meters) in width. Original tree was measured to be 275 feet (84 m) in height and 21 feet (6.4 meters) in diameter.

 

Tokopah Falls (Sequoia National Park)

 

Crescent Meadow (Sequoia National Park)

 

Moro Rock (Sequoia National Park)

General Sherman Tree (Sequoia National Park)

General Sherman is the largest tree in the World by its volume (1488 cubic meters). Its diameter measures at 11.1 meters at the base at height of 83.8 meters. The age of General Sherman Tree is estimated to be 2300- 2800 years. In other words it began to grow around the time when temple of Parthenon in Athens was constructed.

General Sherman Tree got its name in 1879 by naturalist James Wolverton in honor of William Tecumseh Sherman, famous Union general during American Civil War. James Wolverton himself served as a lieutenant in the 9th Indiana Cavalry under Sherman.

 

 

 

 

Fees and permits

The park entrance fee is $20 for private vehicles and $5 for individuals on foot or on bike, and is valid for seven days in both Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.

There are several passes for groups traveling together in a private vehicle or individuals on foot or on bike. These passes provide free entry at national parks and national wildlife refuges, and also cover standard amenity fees at national forests and grasslands, and at lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management and Bureau of Reclamation. These passes are valid at all national parks including Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks:

The $80 Annual Pass (valid for twelve months from date of issue) can be purchased by anyone. Military personnel can obtain a free annual pass in person at a federal recreation site by showing a Common Access Card (CAC) or Military ID.
U.S. citizens or permanent residents age 62 or over can obtain a Senior Pass (valid for the life of the holder) in person at a federal recreation site for $80, or through the mail for $90; applicants must provide documentation of citizenship and age. This pass also provides a fifty percent discount on some park amenities. Seniors can also obtain a $20 annual pass.
U.S. citizens or permanent residents with permanent disabilities can obtain an Access Pass (valid for the life of the holder) in person at a federal recreation site at no charge, or through the mail for $10; applicants must provide documentation of citizenship and permanent disability. This pass also provides a fifty percent discount on some park amenities.
Individuals who have volunteered 250 or more hours with federal agencies that participate in the Interagency Pass Program can receive a free Volunteer Pass.
4th graders can receive an Annual 4th Grade Pass that allows free entry for the duration of the 4th grade school year (September-August) to the bearer and any accompanying passengers in a private non-commercial vehicle. Registration at the Every Kid in a Park website is required.
In 2018 the National Park Service will offer four days on which entry is free for all national parks: January 15 (Martin Luther King Jr. Day), April 21 (1st Day of NPS Week), September 22 (National Public Lands Day), and November 11 (Veterans Day weekend).

 

 

 

 

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