Ermak Travel Guide

 

Tsentralno-Chernozemny Biosphere Reserve

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Description of Tsentralno-Chernozemny Biosphere Reserve

The Tsentralno-Chernozemny (literally: Central Black Soil Reserve) Natural Biosphere Reserve, named after Professor V.V. Alekhin, is a state nature reserve located on the territory of the Kursk Region. The boundaries of the reserve repeatedly changed. The reserve is located in the southwestern part of the Central Russian Upland within the middle belt of the forest-steppe zone, on the territory of the Medvensky, Manturovsky, and Gorshechensky districts of the Kursk region. Area - 5287.4 ha. Number of clusters: 6 (Streletsky area of ​​2,046 hectares, Cossack area of ​​1,638 hectares, Barkalovka (2 plots) - 368 hectares, Bukreev Barmy (2 plots) - 259 hectares, Zorinsky - 495.1, Pozyma river, Psel (2 sites) - 481.3 ha.

 

The territory of the present Tsentralno-Chernozemny Biosphere Reserve at the end of the first - the beginning of the second millennium was occupied by vast steppe open spaces with ravines and gullies overgrown with forests. Here huge herds of tarpans, tours, saigas, kulans grazed. It inhabited an uncountable number of small rodents and woodchucks. Such large birds as a bustard and a little bastard nest. Being on the border of the “Wild Field” and Slavic settlements, the forest-steppe experienced, apparently, a double press, both from the nomadic peoples and from the prince's squads, the sedentary northerly population of Secene. In the XVI century, the main occupation of the inhabitants of Kursk, who defended the southern borders of the Russian state, was agriculture. The raids of the Crimean Tatars demanded a more reliable cover of the southern border. The government began to attract local and alien people to the service, and Don and Zaporozhye free Cossacks were accepted. Archers and gunners were sent here. On June 1, 1626, according to a diploma from Tsar Mikhail Fedorovich, the steppes near Kursk were handed over to servicemen - Cossacks and archers of the Kursk fortress exclusively for grazing and haymaking. Thus Russian tsar preserved, never plowed steppe.

 

 

 

 

 


 

Transportation

 

 

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

 

 

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

 

 

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

 

 

Interesting information and useful tips