Ermak Travel Guide

 

Kholm

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Transportation

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

Interesting information and useful tips

 

Description of Kholm

Kholm - a city (since 1777) in Russia, the administrative center of the Kholmsky municipal district of the Novgorod region. The city is located in the south of the region at the confluence of the Cunha River in Lovat (the basin of Lake Ilmen), 201 km south of Veliky Novgorod.

Four highways lead from the city: one (P51) connects Kholm with Staraya Russa through Poddorye, the other (P51) connects it with Velikiye Luki via Loknya, Pskov region, the third leads to Marevo and Demyansk, the fourth to Toropets.

The population of the city is 3829 inhabitants (as of January 1, 2010). The etymology of the name is Russian, derived from a steep hill on the right bank of the Lovat, on which the city was founded.

 

 

 

History of Kholm

In ancient times, along the Lovat River, a water trade route “from the Varangians to the Greeks” passed through the territory of the modern city. At that time, small vessels were built in this place, they sold flax, carts, spinning wheels, and dishes (wooden and earthenware).

In the 16th — 17th centuries, Lithuanians, Poles, and Swedes repeatedly attacked Kholm. On August 3, 1777, when considering the issue of reorganizing the administrative-territorial division of the Novgorod province, a decree was issued on renaming the Kholmsky tenement into the town of Kholm and regarding it as a Pskov province. So the Kholm became the center of the Kholm region.

At the end of the XIX century, the Kholm was known for handicrafts, including the manufacture of river barges and other boats.

The city was very badly damaged during the Great Patriotic War: in 1942 it was the site of the Toropets-Kholm operation, and most of the historical buildings of the city were completely destroyed.

Historically, the city consisted of four districts - Ilinsky and Nikolsky (right bank of Kunya and Lovati), Tatilovsky (left bank of Lovati) and Klin (wedge between rivers). After the war, the restoration of the Klin part of the city was considered inappropriate.

A curious mistake is connected with the history of the city of Kholm. In a number of books and articles, the date of the first mention of the city in the chronicle sources is 1144 (from which it was proposed to keep the history of the city). This implied the Novgorod first chronicle; however, under this year, it contains a record of a fire in Novgorod as a result of which Kholm (part of the city) and the Church of Elijah burned down.

 

 

 


 

Transportation

 

 

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

 

 

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

 

 

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

 

 

Interesting information and useful tips