Ermak Travel Guide

 

Kholmogory

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Transportation

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

Interesting information and useful tips

 

Description of Kholmogory

Kholmogory (Russian : Холмогоры ) is a historical village and the administrative center of the Kholmogory raion of the Archangel Oblast, in Russia. It is located on the left bank of the Northern Dvina, on the M8 motorway, 75 km southeast of Arcángel and 90 km north of the Monastery of San Troitski Antonievo-Siski. The name is derived from the Finnish Kalmomäki, which means "hill of corpses" (cemetery ). According to the census Russian of 2002, its population was 4,592 inhabitants.

Kholmogory area was first inhabited by the Finn - Ugrians Savolotshij Thsuuds (savolokis ), also called Yems or Karelians in the ancient chronicles of Novgorod. The first Slavic population in the region were the pomors of Vologda after 1220. Already in the fourteenth century, the village (whose name happened to be pronounced Kholmogory) was an important center of trade for the Republic of Novgorod in northern Russia. Its commercial importance even grew in 1554 when the Muscovy Company converted Kholmogory into its center for fur operations. The Swedes besieged the wooden fort during the Tumultuous Period (1613), but they had to withdraw (although later the Russians announced this, there is no record in the Swedish military sources). During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries it was a place of exile, including ex-agent Ana Leopóldovna and her children.

In 1682 the cathedral of Kholmogory was consecrated, with six pillars, the largest in the region. It was destroyed by the Soviets in the 1930s. Despite this, many old sawmills and mills in the area are still preserved. Lomonosov, one of the surrounding villages is the birthplace of the great Russian geographer and writer Mikhail Lomonosov and the sculptor Fedot Shubin. As a local artistic tradition we should highlight the engraving of mammoth tusks and walruses. The bone engraving factory Lomonosov preserves the medieval tradition of this folk art.

 

 

 

 

 


 

Transportation

 

 

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

 

 

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

 

 

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

 

 

Interesting information and useful tips