Ermak Travel Guide

 

Kotlas

Kotlas

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transportation

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

Interesting information and useful tips

 

Description of Kotlas

Kotlas is located in the southern part of the Arkhangelsk region. The administrative center of the Kotlas region. The city stands at the confluence of the Vychegda and the Northern Dvina, about 600 kilometers southeast of Arkhangelsk. Together to the surrounding settlements is a major center for pulp and paper production. Kotlas is also a major rail junction; it connects central Russia with the Komi Republic.

 

Kotlas had a Gulag (labour camp) in the 1930s - 1950s durign reign of Stalin, inhabited by deported kulaks (rich peasants) and other political enemies of newly established Soviet Russia. Such people were put to work in the timber and paper industry. The Kotlas chapter of the "Sovest" organization keeps alive the memory of the people who suffered under the labour camps here. Many persons of Polish descent live here. There is also an airbase in Kotlas (Savatiya).

 

 

 

Travel Destinations in Kotlas

Cathedral of St. Stephan of Perm. Built in 1788, this landmark cathedral honours Stephen of Perm who Christianized the Komi people in the mid 14th century.
Kotlas Pulp and Paper Mill - (now Ilim Group Koryazhma Subsidiary)
Northern Dvina State Basin Authority of Waterways and Navigation

 

 

History of Kotlas

The place was probably inhabited from ancient times, but was only granted official town status by the Provisional Government of Russia on June 16, 1917, when it was a part of Vologda Governorate. In 1918, the area was transferred to the newly formed Northern Dvina Governorate, and in 1924 the uyezds were abolished in favor of the new divisions, the districts (raions). Kotlassky District was established on June 25, 1924. In 1929, Northern Dvina Governorate was merged into Northern Krai, which in 1936 was transformed into Northern Oblast. In 1937, Northern Oblast was split into Arkhangelsk Oblast and Vologda Oblast. Kotlassky District remained in Arkhangelsk Oblast ever since.

Gulag
During the 1930s, Kotlas became a place to which kulaks were deported and made to work in the forestry industry. It was managed by the Kotlaslag division of Gulag. Later, it hosted all possible categories of people repressed during the Stalin era. A significant population of Poles existed in the area, with whole Polish villages resettled here in 1920s and 1930s.

Labor camps existed within the territory of the city until 1953. Besides logging and the paper industry, inmates worked at plant, housing, bridge, and railroad construction. Most of camps were unguarded barrack settlements. In addition, Kotlas was a major transit point for deportees transferred further to the north and east, since it was a railroad terminus. There is a Kotlas branch of the Sovest (Conscience) organization, which seeks to preserve the memory of those times and seek compensation for victims.

Pechora railway
The further development of Kotlas was due to the construction of the Pechora Railway. Already from 1899 Kotlas was connected by a railway line with Vyatka (currently Kirov), which was heavily used for the cargo transport of goods to and from the Northern Dvina River. In 1940, the construction of the railroad connecting Konosha (on the railway stretch between Moscow and Arkhangelsk) to Vorkuta started. The railroad was needed to transport coal, timber, and later oil from the Komi Republic. The headquarters of this railroad were opened in Kotlas. In the same year, Kotlas became a separate administrative unit. In December 1941, the road was completed, and from 1942, the regular service started. Kotlas thus became an important transport hub. The headquarters of the Pechora Railway were located in Kotlas until 1959, when the railway was merged into the Northern Railway.

 

 

 


 

Transportation

Get in
Kotlas Airport - 4 km southeast of Kotlas; small aircraft only - the largest aircraft is an AN4 with 40 seats.
Railway
Road

 

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

 

 

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

 

 

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

 

 

Interesting information and useful tips

 

 

 

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