Ermak Travel Guide

 

Pechory

Pechory

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Description of Pechory

Pechora is located in the Pskov Region, 53 km from Pskov. Pechora stand on the border with Estonia, passing along the river Pizhma (Pize), which flows north of the city. The first mention of the monastery caves (Pechora) dates back to 1392. The founding date of the city is considered to be 1473, when a cave temple was consecrated in honor of the Assumption of the Most Holy Theotokos, and thus the beginning of the Pechora monastery, around which the eponymous fortress soon grew. The walls and towers were built in the second half of the XVI century, at the beginning of the Livonian War. Although Russia eventually lost the war, the fortress remained Russian and in the 17th century successfully withstood several sieges, but lost its importance after the Northern War, since the entire northern Baltic states became part of the Russian Empire, that is, the border shifted to the west.

The suburb, which grew up around the monastery, receives urban status in 1782 and even becomes the center of the county, though not for long. Already in 1796, the county was liquidated, the Pechora turned into a provincial city, almost a monastic suburb, although by the beginning of the 20th century there was still a local hospital and school. In 1889, the Pskov-Riga railway passes along the northern outskirts of the city, in 1931 a branch line was built on Tartu, and the Pechora became a junction station. The development of the “ground” part of the Pskovo-Pechersky Monastery is largely connected with this, the pre-revolutionary period, when numerous eclectic and baroque buildings are added to a pair of 16th-century churches. They form the modern look of the monastery, allowing the eye to distract from the traditional Pskov architecture.

After the revolution, the Pechora were in the zone of confrontation between the Red Army and independent Estonia, and according to the terms of the Tartu Peace Treaty of 1920, they became part of the latter, where they quickly turned into a significant, though not very large city: 11th by population, but second in pace growth. The city shape of Pechora was formed during this period, which was further contributed by the large fire of 1939, so that almost all the stone buildings outside the monastery were built in a short section between the civil war and the Great Patriotic War. In terms of the representativeness of Estonian architecture, the Pechora is almost superior to Rakvere and is second only to the interwar quarters of Tallinn. The proportion of the Estonian population changed no less dramatically: from a hundred and fifty people to a revolution to more than two thousand (50–60%) in the 1930s. After the war, the Pechora region was included in the Pskov region, and the national composition returned to the state of a hundred years old: now in Pechora there is about one percent Estonians, and the rest is mostly Russian.

In addition to the characteristic urban architecture, Estonia contributed to the preservation of the Pechora Monastery: it continued to work in the 1920s and 30s, when all the monasteries in the Soviet Union were closed. Thus, the Pskovo-Pechora Monastery is the only monastery in Russia that has been continuously operating since its foundation. Today, it is he who forms the image of the city: there are always many pilgrims here, and in shops or, for example, at the bus station you will almost certainly see people in cassocks. By the standards of the Pskov region, Pechora looks like a successful city: there are almost no visible abandoned buildings, fresh asphalt is laid in the central streets, buses are hung at the stops. However, there is more than enough dust and dirt here, and there are not many sidewalks on all city streets.

 

 

 

 

 


 

Transportation

 

 

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

 

 

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

 

 

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

 

 

Interesting information and useful tips