Ermak Travel Guide

 

Petrozavodsk

Petrozavodsk

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transportation

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

Interesting information and useful tips

 

Description of Petrozavodsk

Petrozavodsk is a city in northwestern Russia, the capital of the Republic of Karelia. It is the administrative center of Prionezhsky district and forms Petrozavodsk urban district. April 6, 2015 awarded the honorary title of the Russian Federation "City of Military Glory."

 

 

 

Travel Destinations in Petrozavodsk

Orientation
Lenin Avenue is the main street of Petrozavodsk with a large number of restaurants, cafes and shops. The main administrative buildings are located on Lenin Avenue, as well as various architectural monuments. Lenin Avenue stretches from the railway station and Gagarin Square (above, in the west) to the embankment of Lake Onega (below, in the east). The green embankment of impressive length is remarkable for the coordinated composition of the monuments, the presence of a restaurant and cultural and entertainment centers. Karl Marx Avenue, connecting the areas of Kirov and Lenin, famous for its architectural ensembles XVIII - XIX centuries and 1950s.

 

City embankment (Onezhskaya embankment). Pedestrian street along the shore of Petrozavodsk Bay of Lake Onega. Sculptures donated by the twin cities are set along the street.
Monument to Peter I, Petrovsky Square. The monument to the first Russian emperor Peter I by sculptor Ivan Nikolaevich Schroeder and architect Hippolyt Antonovich Monigetti opened in 1873.
Park of Culture and Rest (Former Petrovsky Garden, Summer Garden). The oldest park in Russia, founded in 1703. The park has a monument to the Petrovsky Plant, there are many attractions, there are quite new ones, as well as a observation wheel.
The quarter of the historical building is bounded by the bank of the Neglinka River, the streets of Kuybyshev, Fedosova and Malaya Slobodskaya. A couple of quarters with stone and wooden historic houses almost on the shores of Lake Onega. The formation of this area began as early as the 1970s, and in the course of its development, several dozen houses, destined for demolition, were transported here from other areas of the city.
Catherine's Church, Volnaya Street, 1. A wooden church in the style of provincial classicism was built in 1878 at the expense of local entrepreneurs. In Soviet times, the temple was closed only during the war and successfully existed until the 2000s, when its restoration was carried out. The fire of 2012 damaged the building, but in 2013 the services began again. The church stands on the Neglinsky cemetery, which arose in 1877 at the site of the abolished Old Believers. To the west of the fence Neglinsky cemetery located Jewish cemetery, existing since the beginning of the XIX century.
Lenin Square (formerly Round Square). Wikidan Element Despite its more than trivial name, the square represents a nice architectural ensemble in the style of Russian provincial classicism and is a historical and architectural monument of federal significance. The memorial complex "Mass grave and the grave of the Unknown Soldier with the Eternal Flame" is located in the south-east of the square.
Kirov Square. On the square there is a square and several buildings of architectural monuments of the XVIII - XIX centuries. It is also the venue for major city events and celebrations. At the beginning of the 20th century all four main churches of the city were concentrated here, there was a monument to the emperor, all of them were destroyed by 1936. Following this, a monument to the Bolshevik Sergei Mironovich Kirov and the building of the Musical Theater were built on the square and still stand, the building of the Finnish theater was reconstructed. In addition, urban buildings between Kirov and Lenin squares are included in the list of architectural monuments, as an example of ensemble buildings of the 1950s. Here (along Karl Marx Avenue) there are three city parks and a boulevard, making this part of the city one of the most pleasant for walking in the city.
Governor's Park. It was formed in 1917 after the merger of two private gardens: the garden of the mountain commander (the end of the 18th century) and the Governor’s garden (the 1840s). In the center of the park, a monument to the poet and the first Olonets governor, Gavriil Romanovich Derzhavin, was erected.
Alexander Nevsky Cathedral. The construction of the cathedral was carried out according to the project of architect Alexander Ivanovich Postnikov under the supervision of engineer Pietro Carlo Madeni in 1826-1832. The icons were written by the artist A. S. Chizhov. Built on donations by the craftsmen of the Alexander Plant.
Stone forest with open-pit lake. A small park in the city center. Previously, there was a stone quarry, and now it is filled with water.

 

 

History Petrozavodsk

Archeological discoveries in the urban area indicate the presence of a settlement as far back as seven thousand years ago, and during the Middle Ages the site of modern city was marked by several lakeside villages. Within the city limits, the district of Solomennoje appears in surviving records dating back to the sixteenth century, and a map produced by the Flemish cartographer Abraham Ortelius at the end of that century places a settlement here called Onegaborg on the site of modern Petrozavodsk.

On September 11, 1703, Prince Menshikov founded the settlement of Petrovskaya Sloboda ("Petrine Sloboda"). He did so at the behest of Tsar Peter the Great, who needed a new iron foundry to manufacture cannons and anchors for the Baltic Fleet at the time of the Great Northern War (1700–1721). At first the foundry used the name Shuysky zavod (literally, "factory at the Shuya River"), but a decade later it became Petrovsky zavod ("Petrine factory"), after the name of the reigning monarch. From this form the present name of the city derives.

By 1717, Petrovskaya Sloboda had grown into the largest settlement in Karelia, with about 3,500 inhabitants, a timber fort, a covered market, and miniature palaces of the Tsar and Menshikov. The town's best-known landmark became the wooden church of Saints Peter and Paul, rebuilt in 1772 and renovated in 1789. The church retained its original iconostasis until this relic of Peter's reign was destroyed by fire on October 30, 1924.

After Peter's death, Petrovskaya Sloboda became depopulated and the factory declined. It closed down in 1734, although foreign industrialists maintained copper factories in the vicinity.

The industry revived in 1773 when Catherine the Great established a new iron foundry upstream the Lososinka River. Designed to provide cannons for the ongoing Russo-Turkish Wars, the foundry was named Alexandrovsky, after Alexander Nevsky, who was considered a patron saint of the region. The factory was modernized and expanded under supervision of Charles Gascoigne in 1787–96. Local pundits claim that the first railway in the world (чугунный колесопровод) was inaugurated for industrial uses of the Alexandrovsky foundry in 1788.

During Catherine's municipal reform of 1777, Petrovskaya Sloboda was incorporated as a town, whereupon its name was changed to Petrozavodsk. A new Neoclassical city center was then built, focused on the newly planned Round Square. In 1784 Petrozavodsk was large enough to supplant Olonets as the administrative center of the region. Although Emperor Paul abolished Olonets Governorate, it was revived as a separate guberniya in 1801, with Petrozavodsk as its administrative center.

During the Finnish military administration of East Karelia in the Continuation War (1941–1944), the city was styled as Äänislinna (or Ääneslinna), rather than the traditional Petroskoi. The new name was a literal translation of Onegaborg, the name of a settlement marked on a 16th-century map by Abraham Ortelius near the present-day city, Ääninen being the Finnish toponym for Lake Onega.

In 1977, Petrozavodsk was the epicenter of what is called the Petrozavodsk phenomenon.

 

 

 


 

Transportation

Get in
1 Petrozavodsk Airport Besovets. (PES IATA) is small and is located 12 km outside the city. As of January 2014, the only flight is from Moscow 5 times a week (except Wednesdays and Saturdays). Price is 6000 RUB. Airport is connected with the city by bus 117V, which only runs once, when the flight arrives and departs. If you miss this bus, to get on another you'll have to walk 1,5km south to Petrozavodsk - Suoyarvi highway, where there are buses to Petrozavodsk approximately every 45 minutes.

The city is easily reached by train from Saint Petersburg. There are both day and night trains leaving from Ladozhsky station, a second class sleeper ticket will set you back about 1100 RUB. The Lastochka Premium train takes just under five hours while most other trains have a travel time of 7-8 hours. Moscow is 16 hours away on a over-night service, trains depart from the Leningradsky station with second class tickets costing from 2200 RUB. All trains bound for Murmansk makes stop-overs here so there are long-distance connections with Kaliningrad (44 h), Kiev (41 h), Minsk (24 h) and seasonal trains from Black Sea resorts as Sochi (55 h) which serves mostly tourists travelling home. Slow regional trains also connects with various smaller cities in Karelia such as Kostomuksha (13 h) and Suoyarvi (4 h). 2 Petrozavodsk railway station (Петрозаводск-Пасс) is located on ul. Gagarina, just west of the city centre.

There are bus services from Saint Petersburg daily with Avokzal and an international connection from Helsinki with Incoming Finland on Fridays and Sundays. Buses departs from the railway station at 7AM and arrives in Petrozavodsk at 8:30PM. There is also a bus service from Tampere leaving the railway station at 8PM each Monday and Friday and arriving 8:30PM. A one-way ticket costs €40, return €75. Cheaper tickets are available with Savonlinja which has services from Joensuu for as cheap as €13.

Petrozavodsk is along the M18-RUS.svg highway, also known as Kola Highway which links Saint Petersburg and Murmansk. The road is mostly in good condition but expect long driving distances and few gas stations along the way.

Get around
The town has a moderate size. Center is easily walkable. A taxi anywhere in town costs 100 Rubles or less. Buses run frequently along the major routes.

The railway station is located at the southern end of Leninsky Prospekt, which cuts through the center of town all the way to the embankment on Lake Onego. It is about a 30 minute walk from the station to the lake.

 

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

Hotel Karelia, Gulling Embankment 2 (Northeast of the railway station, about a 45 minute walk or 10 minute bus ride), ☎ +7 8142 733-333, e-mail: reserv@hotel.karelia.ru. A new well-run hotel with several amenities, including gym, spa, restaurant, and a helpful tourism department that runs tours to Kizhi. Part of the Best Eastern Hotels group.
Hotel Fregat, Prospekt Karla Marxa 1a (On the lake side of the ferry terminal building), ☎ +7 8142 774-853, +7 8142 764-162, fax: +7 8142 764-163, e-mail: fregat@karelia.ru. A small but clean hotel close to the ferry dock. Good for early risers who want to catch the first boat to Kizhi in the morning. It is a little hard to find; the door faces the lake, not the street, and one must ring the bell to be admitted, then the reception desk is up the stairs.
Hotel Severnaya, Prospekt Lenina 21 (Halfway between the railway station and the lake, about a 15 minute walk from the station), ☎ +7 8142 762-080, e-mail: reservation@severnaja.onego.ru. An older but decently-maintained hotel in the downtown area, closer to the railway station than the other hotels. Part of the Intourist Hotels group. From R700 per night.
Hotel ONEGO. Small hotel on a boat, 300 m walk to the right from the ferry dock, then across a small bridge, near hotel Karelia (by car) R 900 per night for a single (4 rooms share 2 baths), pleasant and clean, 24 hours.

 

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

 

 

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

 

 

Interesting information and useful tips

Consulates
Finland Finland, 25 Gogolya St., ☎ +7 (8142) 555-025, +7 8142 761-564, +7 8142 766-208 (common), +7 (921) 726-0874 (F 5PM to M 8.30AM only for Finnish citizens in case of emergency), fax: +7 (8142) 767-167, e-mail: sanomat.pet@formin.fi. Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri - 9-00 - 12-00 and 13-00 - 15-45; Wed 9-00 - 12-00.
Sweden Sweden, 25 Gogolya St.. Visa for locals, no other consular service provided.

 

Buy
Karelian wooden artworks. Karelian birch is of particular beauty and skilled artists add to its value as well. Avoid buying any antiques (especially of military character such as medals) that could be considered of cultural value by the Customs.
Photo books. They make great presents at home and can be a replacement for photos that might be hard to take such as Kizhi (if you don't happen to get out on the island).