Ermak Travel Guide

 

Totma

Totma

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transportation

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

Interesting information and useful tips

 

Description of Totma

Totma is located in the eastern part of the Vologda region. Totma is not less interesting than the neighboring Great Ustyug, and from the tourist point of view, this city of the Russian North, underestimated, lying on the Sukhona River. The city, which at the present time, bears the memory of Russian explorers and navigators who have mastered Siberia and Russian America. Evidences of this are on every corner, be it monuments, temples-ships of authentic Totma baroque and even an American silver fox, unique from the point of view of Russian heraldry, located on the city's coat of arms. The natural objects on Sukhona are interesting in the vicinity of the city.

A visit to the city will be especially interesting for pilgrims, travelers who are interested in the history of Russia, lovers of auto expeditions. The trip is better to plan for summer time.

 

 

 

History of Totma

It was first mentioned in the chronicles in 1137 (according to other sources—in 1138) as the pogost of Todma (Тодма). It was founded by Novgorodians, who used the Sukhona as the main waterway leading to the north and eventually to the White Sea. The name "Totma" is nevertheless of Finno-Ugrian origin, which, together with archeological discoveries, indicates that an earlier settlement on the site of the present town was established by the Merya people. The original pogost was located 16 kilometers (9.9 mi) downstream of the current location, close to the mouth of the Staraya Totma River. In the 13th century, salt production started around Totma and the town was relocated. In 1539, Totma was plundered by Kazan Tatars; a fortress was built after this event. In 1554, monk Feodosy Sumorin founded the Transfiguration Monastery. In the 16th–17th centuries, Totma was one of the most prosperous towns of the Russian North, due to the trade and to the salt production. In the 17th and 18th centuries, Totma was visited several times by Peter the Great, which was rather exceptional given the remote location of the town.

In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, Totma was included into Archangelgorod Governorate and named one of the towns constituting the governorate. In the 18th century, Totma was one of the main centers of the exploration of and the trade with Alaska. In particular, Ivan Kuskov, the first administrator of Fort Ross, a Russian fortress in California, was a native of Totma. In 1780, Totma became the seat of Totemsky Uyezd of Vologda Viceroyalty, and since 1796 it was a part of Vologda Governorate.

In the 19th century, Totma quickly lost its significance as the foreign trade was rerouted from Arkhangelsk to St. Petersburg and the river transportation was gradually replaced by railways and highways. The railway from Vologda to Arkhangelsk was constructed along the shortest way via Konosha and bypassed Totma, while the old highway from Moscow to Arkhangelsk never ran via Totma. Until the late 1990s, the only road through Totma connected Vologda with Veliky Ustyug via Nikolsk.[citation needed] In the second half of the 19th century, Totma was frequently used as a destination for political exile.

On July 15, 1929, several governorates, including Vologda Governorate, were merged into Northern Krai and the uyezds were abolished. Totma became the administrative center of Totemsky District, which included parts of former Totemsky Uyezd.

 

 

 


 

Transportation

Paved roads connect Totma with Vologda via Kadnikov (southwest), Veliky Ustyug via Nyuksenitsa (northeast), and Nikolsk via Imeni Babushkina (east). Before the road between Totma and Veliky Ustyug along the Sukhona was completed in the first decade of the 2000s, the only connection between the towns was via Nikolsk.

The Sukhona is navigable in Totma; however, there is no passenger navigation.

 

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

 

 

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

 

 

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

 

 

Interesting information and useful tips