Ermak Travel Guide

 

Give me an incentive to work on this project by sharing this link on your social media, forums and other websites.

 

You can also donate to help my project. Thank you

 

 

Pompeii for kids

Pompeii for kids

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pompeii for kids

The Romans had their own version of fast foods. Most citizens bought food from local Thermopolies (from the Greek "hot city"). The food here was prepared and stored in large amphoras that were warmed by the fires from below.

Pompeii is not the first city destroyed by the volcano Mount Vesuvius. Cities from the time of the Bronze Age were also destroyed a few centuries before. The time has passed, people have forgotten and began to settle in these lands, attracted by volcanic soil enriched with minerals perfect for growing vineyards and large trees. After the eruption, people returned to this land for the same reason.

According to approximate estimates, about 15,000-20,000 people lived in the city. Of these, about 10,000 to 16,000 people died. The rest were saved. The new Roman emperor even took care of the survivors.

 

 

 

Pompeii for kids

The Romans were among the first who began to build their toilets, not only in private homes, but also as separate  public toilets. True, there were no partitions in them, and instead of toilet paper they used a sponge on a stick, one for all. The Romans only moistened this sponge in water. However, going to such a public toilet was also very dangerous. Thieves and gangsters who robbed visitors often worked there. Some Romans even wore talismans for successful toilet visits.

Pompeii for kids

Crossings across the street in Pompeii are somewhat similar to ours, but unlike modern painted Romans made them of stone. The fact is that during the rain sewers could not cope with the streams and the streets were often flooded. Carts could pass between the stones. (Roman House and Street)

Pompeii for kids

Archeologists found many statues Pompeii. They were hewn out of stone, marble, made out of bronze. After discovery, royal families sent them as presents to other royal homes throughout Europe. Masters throughout the continents copied these statues or made new ones in the manner of the Romans. However, they made a small mistake. In ancient times, statues were painted in bright colors. However, through the centuries the paint was lost. Sculptures copied ancient works of art, thinking that they are colorless. In fact, the ancient Romans would not appreciate the modern statues. For them, they were very boring and not realistic.

Romans had many gods. All conquered nations retained their gods, while recognizing the gods of the Romans as the main ones. In addition to the official pantheon, each family had its own patron god, the so-called genius of the family. It was the own god of the house, to whom Lararia, the altars dedicated to the home god, were built. In the photo above, a thermopoly depicts such a lararium in the upper right corner with the image of the gods.

The Romans did not greatly appreciate childhood as an important point in the formation of man. In fact, the children in the understanding of the Romans were inferior people. Therefore, in the whole city there was not a single structure or playground for the game, intended for children.

 

Pompeii for kids

 

In ancient times there were no social media like ours. But people no less wanted to leave their stupid and unnecessary opinion. To do this, use the walls of toilets, houses, etc. In the sense of these inscriptions are not far removed from our modern inscriptions on the fence. Sometimes there were interesting entries.

The eruption of Vesuvius began the day after the celebration of the god Vulcan on August 24, 79. Many residents took it as a good sign from the gods and therefore very few people used the nearly 24 hour window to escape from the city. Some continued to live an ordinary life: they cooked food, cleaned their houses, even decided to visit a local bathhouse. They only avoided going out because of falling pumice. The city was destroyed only on the morning of the next day on August 25. Then a wave of geological rocks swept the city at a speed of 450 m/h / 720 km/h with a temperature of 1830 F/999C (Chronology of the Death of Pompeii).

The eruption of 79 was not the first blow to the city. As early as 62, Pompeii was seriously damaged by an earthquake. Even 17 years later, some buildings were not completely renovated. Lead pipes were still laid along the streets, as after the earthquake the aqueduct was damaged and could not supply the entire city for weeks.

Other interesting facts about Pompeii. Most interesting facts