Ermak Travel Guide

The World at your fingertips 

 

 

Feel free to leave your comments below. If you want to share your knowledge, additional information or experience in a particular place your input is more than welcome.

Peak Ai- Petri (Ай- Петри)

 

 

 
Location: Yalta municipality  Map

Elevation: 1234 meters (4049 feet)

Cable Car Fee:

Adult: 60 hryven

Children: 30 hryven

 

10 largest cities of Russia
Moscow
St. Petersburg
Novosibirsk
Yekaterinburg
Nizhny Novgorod
Kazan
Chelyabinsk
Omsk
Samara
Rostov-on-Don

 

 

 

 

 

Transportation

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

Interesting information and useful tips

 

Description of Mountain Ai- Petri

Mountain Ai- Petri is the highest mountain on the Crimean Peninsula at an elevation of 1234 meters (4049 feet). It is towers over municipality of Alupka and Yalta.

 

Name of Ai- Petri mountain is translated from Greek language as Saint Peter (Άγιος Πέτρος) after a Greek Orthodox monastery that once stood on Ai- Petri plateau near its peak. It was dedicated to Christ's apostle Saint Peter. The easiest to get here is by cable car from Alupka. Its total length is 3.5 km taking all the way to the base of the peak. Two kilometres of this cable between Ai- Petri mountain and station Pine Forest (Сосновый Бор) has support, which is considered the longest in Europe. Another way to get to the top is by taking a taxi. It is about 20- 30 minutes of drive, but you have no chance of being stuck in a cable car as it happened in August 2013 when several people were stuck for hours there.

 

Once you will get to the parking lot you will met numerous restaurants and several stables with horses, ponies, donkeys and even camels. Although I would suggest skipping taking a meal here, you can take a rent horse to explore the plateau around Ai- Petri. Short climb to the top of the Ain Petri is not very long or too steep. However the rocks were well polished by thousands of tourists (including last Russian emperor Nicholas II with his family) over a course of decades so they might get fairly slippery. So watch you feet. Once you will get to the top you can do base jumping if you risk it from the peak. Ai- Petri is very steep on its South side offering a fantastic view of the Black Sea below. The north side of the mountain is a different matter. It is a plateau that is virtually flat covered with low pines and patches of broad leafed forests.

 

Ai- Petri peak is one of the most windiest in Crimea. Wind velocity on top reaches a speed of 50 m/s (110 mph). Despite that the plateau on the Northern part is well protected from the nature's wrath. People settled this area since the Stone age. Their tools and weapons were discovered here. In addition there are several caves that keep temperature cool all year long. Today these caves are open to the public. The trails are fairly well marked. The largest cave is known as Trechglazka (Трехглазка) or Three eyed cave.

 

 

 

 

 

Administratively refers to the Yalta city district of Crimea. The height of the mountain is 1234 m. There are the Glavnaya/Main (1234 m), Zapadnaya/ Western and Vostochnaya/ Eastern (1100 m) peaks of Ai-Petri. The silhouette of the mountain completes the line of the picturesque amphitheater from the sea itself - Cape Ai-Todor with the Swallow's Nest - to the famous curly teeth. Ai-Petri dents consist of four large (60-80 m high) and a series of small protrusions on the ridge, formed during the weathering of heterogeneous reef limestones.

On Ai-Petri there is a maximum number of foggy days in the Crimea (in 1970 - 215 days). The maximum amount of precipitation on Ai-Petri (and in the Crimea) - 1718 mm - was recorded in 1981. Ai-Petri is the most windy point of Crimea - (in 1949 the wind blew here for 125 days at a speed of more than 15 m / s). At Ai-Petri, the highest wind speed was also recorded - 50 m / s. There is a wind farm on the plateau, however, due to the strong wind, the blades were ripped off and now it is inoperative. Also on the plateau, on Perepelinaya Gora (Beden-Kyr - 1320 m), in Soviet times a complex of radar stations for tracking air and space was built.

Ai-Petri is located above the city of Alupka and the village of Koreiz in the territory that is part of the Yalta Mountain Forest Reserve.

A cableway - Miskhor - Sosnovy Bor - Ai-Petri with one of the longest unsupported spans in Europe was laid from South Coast to Ai-Petri. The mountain offers a beautiful panorama of the Black Sea and Yalta. On the plateau is a small village Okhotnichye.

By car, you can get to Ai-Petri along the Yalta-Bakhchisaray highway (past the Uchan-Su waterfall and the Silver Arbor). From the north, the road to the top comes from the Belbek Valley, from the village of Sokolinoye. Under difficult weather conditions and during a fire hazard period (July-August), the road is often blocked by the traffic police for safety reasons. Sometimes pass only passenger cars. In winter, the traffic on Ai-Petri is regulated by the traffic police post located in the middle of the serpentine after the resting place "Uchan-Su Waterfall". Often the driveway is further open only for SUVs equipped with snow chains.

One of the walking routes to the peak of Ai-Petri goes from the Uchan-Su waterfall along the Botkin and Taraktash trails to the plateau and further along the dirt road to the Yalta-Bakhchisaray highway.

A number of climbing routes of difficulty categories 1-5 were laid to the top of the mountain, including through Ai-Petri tines. Also in the immediate vicinity of the summit are the beginnings of several routes for cycling.

The highest point of the Ai-Petri plateau is Mount Roka - 1346 m above sea level.

In pre-revolutionary times, Felix Feliksovich Sumarokov-Elston-Yusupov (elder) gave Ai-Petri Mount to his wife, Zinaida Nikolaevna Yusupova.

 

 


 

Transportation

 

 

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

 

 

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

 

 

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

 

 

Interesting information and useful tips

 

 

 

blog comments powered by Disqus