Ermak Travel Guide

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Yalta (Ялта)

 

 
Location: Crimean Peninsula

 

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Yalta History

History of Yalta
12th–19th centuries
The existence of Yalta was first recorded in the 12th century by an Arab geographer, who described it as a Byzantine port and fishing settlement. It became part of a network of Genoese trading colonies on the Crimean coast in the 14th century, when it was known as Etalita or Galita. Crimea was captured by the Ottoman Empire in 1475, which made it a semi-independent subject territory under the rule of the Crimean Khanate but the southern coast with Yalta was under direct Ottoman rule forming the Eyalet of Kefe (Feodosiya). Yalta was annexed by the Russian Empire in 1783, along with the rest of Crimea, sparking the Russo-Turkish War, 1787-1792. Prior to the annexation of the Crimea, the Crimean Greeks were moved to Mariupol in 1778; one of the villages they established nearby is also called Yalta.

In the 19th century, the town became a fashionable resort for the Russian aristocracy and gentry. Leo Tolstoy spent summers there and Anton Chekhov in 1898 bought a house (the White Dacha) here, where he lived till 1902; Yalta is the setting for Chekhov's short story, "The Lady with the Dog", and such prominent plays as The Three Sisters were written in Yalta. The town was also closely associated with royalty. In 1889 Tsar Alexander III finished construction of Massandra Palace a short distance to the north of Yalta and Nicholas II built the Livadia Palace south-west of the town in 1911.

20th century
During the 20th century Yalta was the principal holiday resort of the Soviet Union. In 1920, Vladimir Lenin issued a decree "On the Use of Crimea for the Medical Treatment of the Working People" which endorsed the region's transformation from a fairly exclusive resort area into a recreation facility for tired proletarians. Numerous workers' sanatoria were constructed in and around Yalta and the surrounding district. There were, in fact, few other places that Soviet citizens could come for a seaside holiday, as foreign travel was forbidden to all but a handful. The Soviet elite also came to Yalta; the Soviet premier Joseph Stalin used the Massandra Palace as his summer residence.

Yalta was occupied by the German Army from 9 November 1941 to 16 April 1944.

The town came to worldwide attention in 1945 when the Yalta Conference between the "Big Three" powers – the Soviet Union, the United States and the United Kingdom – was held at the Livadia Palace.

 

Yalta Conference

 

Yalta Travel Destinations

Yalta Embankment Central Promenade

 

 

Chapel of New Martyrs and Russian Confessors

 

 

Saint Alexander Nevsky Cathedral

 

 

 

Armenian Church (Армянская Церковь)

 

 

Roman Catholic Church of the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin Mary

Chapel of Saint Nicholas (Часовня Святого Николая Чудотворца)

 

 

Palace of the Emir of Bukhara (Дворец Эмира Бухарского)

 

Yalta Weather

Yalta weather is considered subtropical Mediterranean. Yalta is protected by picturesque 1400 meter mountain range that protects the city from cold fronts from mainland. Average temperatures here range from 4 °C in February to 24 C in July. Summers are fairly hot and dry (average 62% humidity). In total Yalta has 276 sunny days so rain is unlikely to ruin your vacation here.

 

 

 


 

Transportation

 

 

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

 

 

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

 

 

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

 

 

Interesting information and useful tips