Ermak Travel Guide

 

Penza

Penza

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transportation

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

Interesting information and useful tips

 

Description of Penza

Penza is a city (since 1663) located on the Volga Upland in the center of the European part of Russia. It is an administrative, economic and cultural center of the Penza Region (since 1939). It is a city of regional importance, forms the municipality of the city district of Penza. Population - 523,553 people. (2018). The city was founded in 1663 by decree of Tsar Alexei Mikhailovich.

 

 

 

Travel Destinations in Penza

Orientation
Penza stretches along the left bank of the Sura, which has a difficult relief: the northern part of the center is at the level of the river, and the southern part is at the top of a high hill. The elevation difference reaches 100 meters, so try to build a route so as not to climb a hill several times.

Three important streets pass through the center of the city from north to south: Volodarsky lined by merchant houses of the 18th-19th centuries are almost unchanged; Moskovskaya - the main pedestrian street with a large number of attractions, cafes and shops; and Kirov - a transport highway, in the southern part of which there are the oldest buildings of the city.

 

 

History of Penza

Penza was founded as a Russian frontier fortress-city, and to this day, remnants of the Lomovskaya sentry line built in 1640 have been preserved at the western edge of the city, and remains of earth ramparts dating from the mid-16th century are preserved in the city center. Until 1663, Penza was a wooden stockade with only a small settlement. In May 1663, the architect Yuri Kontransky arrived in Penza on the Tsar's orders to direct the construction of a fortress city,[citation needed] as part of a wider fortress building program to protect Russia from attacks by Crimean Tatars. The initial construction consisted of a wooden Kremlin, a village, and quarters for the nobility, small tradesmen, and merchants. The Muscovite government placed the Ukrainian Cossacks here, who constructed a fortress and called it "Cherkassy Ostroh", from which the regional city of Penza has developed, thanks to the arrival of new settlers, particularly Russians. The Ukrainian roots of the city and its first settlers are now remembered in the names of Cherkasskaya street, along with the "Cherkassy" historical district.

In 1774, the insurgent army led by Yemelyan Pugachev occupied Penza after the citizens of the city welcomed the rebellious Cossacks. The first stone houses started to appear after 1801, and by 1809 Penza's population had grown to more than 13,000 people.

In 1918, Vladimir Lenin sent a telegram to communists in the Penza area, complaining about the "insurrection of five kulak districts". He urged the public hanging of 100 "landlords, richmen, bloodsuckers", grain seizure, and hostage taking. This telegram has been used in several historical works on the period and on Lenin.During the Russian Civil War, the Czechoslovak Legions launched an anti-Bolshevik uprising in Penza.

During the Soviet period, the city developed as a regional industrial center. The Ural mainframe was made here between 1959 and 1964.

 

 

 


 

Transportation

 

 

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

 

 

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

 

 

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

 

 

Interesting information and useful tips