Ermak Travel Guide

 

 

Blagoveshchensk

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Description of Blagoveshchensk

Blagovestchensk - a city in Russia. It is the administrative center of the Amur region and the Blagoveshchensky district, that forms the "City District of the city of Blagoveshchensk." With the population of 225,091 (2018), it is the fifth largest city in the Far East. Located on the left bank of the Amur and on the right bank of the Zeya (at the mouth); the only administrative center of the region of Russia, located on the state border, the Chinese city of Heihe stands on the right bank of the Amur, a distance of 526 meters.

Blagoveshchensk - the final railway station on the line, departing from the station Belogorsk on Transsib. Ignatievo International Airport. Scientific and educational center. It was founded in 1856 as the Ust-Zeya military post; since 1858 - the city of Blagoveshchensk (from the Church of the Annunciation). Preserved fragments of wooden architecture from the late XIX century.

 

 

 

History of Blagoveshchensk

Early history of the region
The early residents of both sides of the Amur in the region of today's Blagoveshchensk were the Daurs and Duchers. An early settlement in the area of today's Blagoveshchensk was the Ducher town whose name was reported by the Russian explorer Yerofey Khabarov as Aytyun in 1652; it has been identified with what is currently known to the archaeologists as the Grodekovo site, after the nearby village of Grodekovo (which is located on the left bank of the Amur, some 25–30 km (16–19 mi) south of Blagoveshchensk). The Grodekovo site is thought by archaeologists to have been populated since ca. 1000 CE.

As the Russians tried to assert their control over the region, the Ducher town was probably vacated when the Duchers were evacuated by the Qing to the Sungari or Hurka in the mid-1650s.[14] Since 1673, the Chinese re-used the site for their fort ("Old Aigun", in modern literature), which served in 1683-1685 as a base for the Manchus' campaign against the Russian fort of Albazin further north.

After the capture of Albazin in 1685 or 1686, the Chinese relocated their town, to a new site on the right (southwestern, i.e. presently Chinese) bank of the Amur, about 3 miles (4.8 km) downstream from the original site; it later became known as Aigun.

The series of conflicts between Russians and China ended with Russia's recognition of the Chinese sovereignty over both sides of the Amur by the Nerchinsk Treaty of 1689.

The Russian settlement
As the balance of power in the region has changed by the mid-19th century, the Russian Empire was able to take over the left (generally northern, but around Blagoveshchensk, eastern) shore of the Amur from China. Since the 1858 Aigun Treaty and the 1860 Treaty of Peking, the river has remained the border between the countries, although the Qing subjects were allowed to continue to live in the so-called Sixty-Four Villages east of the Amur and the Zeya (i.e., within today's Blagoveshchensk's eastern suburbs).

Although Russian settlers had lived in the area as early as 1644 as "Hailanpao" (海蘭泡/海兰泡, the Chinese name for the city),[citation needed] the present-day city began in 1856 as the military outpost of Ust-Zeysky; its name means settlement at the mouth of the Zeya River in Russian. Tsar Alexander II gave approval for the founding of the city in 1858, to be named Blagoveshchensk, literally means "the city of good news", after the parish Church of the Annunciation and declared to be seat of government for the Amur region.

According to Blagoveshchensk authorities, by 1877 the city had some 8,000 residents, with merely 15 foreigners (presumably, Chinese) among them.

The city was an important river port and trade center during the late 19th century, with growth further fueled by a gold rush early in the 20th century and by its position on the Chinese border, just hundreds of meters across from the city of Heihe.

Local historian note the preeminence of Blagoveshchensk in the economy of the late 19th century Russian Far East, which was reflected by a "small detail": When the heir to Russian throne, Nicholas Alexandrovich (future Tsar Nicholas II) visited in 1891 during his grand tour of Asia, the locals presented him with bread and salt on a gold tray, rather than on a silver one, as it was done in other cities of the region.

 

 

 

 


 

Transportation

 

 

Hotels, motels and where to sleep

 

 

Restaurant, taverns and where to eat

 

 

Cultural (and not so cultural) events

 

 

Interesting information and useful tips